New Look: MCA

By on 04-04-2012 in Architecture, Inspired By, Interior Design, Went Here

The MCA has reopened after being transformed into a major cultural centre for contemporary art and creative learning following a AUD$53 million upgrade and extension. As a local to The Rocks area, I am a long-time fan and visitor of the MCA and have been eagerly awaiting the reopening of the Museum.

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With a multitude of artworks and installations on display, I headed down to check it out last week and was not disappointed. The sleek new addition of carefully designed ‘building blocks’ by local architect Sam Marshall allow for huge gallery space with contemporary finishes and the carefully positioned sneak peaks to the beautiful surrounding views.

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Every now and then you faced with glimpse of the stunning harbour that is just outside. Whether it be through the clear glass encased lift, the windows in the learning centre or the awesome sculpture terrace on the rooftop, the Museum’s prime location is celebrated through the new addition.

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‘Automated Colour Field’ 2011 by Rebecca Baumann – A series of flip clocks mounted in a grid with the numbers replaced by bright coloured cards – each clock flicks per minute, revealing a new pop of colour.

‘Sunrise #3’ 2005 by Robert Owen – This bold geometric artwork is all about structure, colour, perception and light. It is designed with the ability to be moved to another space and reconfigure by flipping and reorienting to suit different walls.

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The main thing that I wanted to see at the MCA was ‘The Clock’ by Christian Marclay. It is displayed in the huge Level 1 Gallery in the new Mordant wing – this space features a massive screen with approximately 30 comfy sofas spread out to lounge on while watching the 24 hour video art piece.
“The Clock comprises several thousand short extracts from cinema history, each suggesting a particular time of day or referencing a specific moment, often through the appearance of a watch or clock-face.
They are edited together to form a continuous visual sequence synchronised with the real time of visitors in the gallery who watch the film; and they suggest countless interlocking narratives despite the constant changes in genres, eras, locations and plot lines.”
A must see!